Andrew Microwave Antennas

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Andrew Microwave Antennas

andrew microwave antennas

    microwave antennas

  • (Microwave antenna) A parabolic antenna is a high-gain reflector antenna used for radio, television and data communications, and also for radiolocation (radar), on the UHF and SHF parts of the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • (Microwave Antenna) Apparatus designed for transmitting radio energy to satellites or receiving it from them,(over 1000MHz or above on the radio spectrum) and includes any mountings or brackets attached to such apparatus.

    andrew

  • (New Testament) disciple of Jesus; brother of Peter; patron saint of Scotland
  • (andrews) United States naturalist who contributed to paleontology and geology (1884-1960)
  • Andrew is the English form of a given name and surname common in many countries. Alternatives include Andrey, Andrei, Andreiy, ‘Andreas’, ‘Andreu’, ‘Andrés’, ‘Anders’, ‘Endrew’, 'Andrej' and ‘André’. ‘Andrew’ is a common name in English-speaking countries.

andrew microwave antennas – US Made

US Made 6 ft ASUS D-Link Netgear Wireless Router WiFi Antenna Extension Cable – Times Microwave LMR-240 Coaxial Cable Antenna Coax wire with RP-SMA & N Male Connectors for External Antennas lmr240
US Made 6 ft ASUS D-Link Netgear Wireless Router WiFi Antenna Extension Cable - Times Microwave LMR-240 Coaxial Cable Antenna Coax wire with RP-SMA & N Male Connectors for External Antennas lmr240
MADE IN THE USA – This Genuine Times Microwave USA Made LMR-240 coaxial cable was developed to provide an extremely low loss alternative with the transmission characteristics of hardline coaxial cables and the flexibility required for WiFi, Ham and CB Radio installations. Times Microwave systems, designs and manufactures high performance coaxial cables, connectors and cable assemblies for a broad range of RF transmission applications. For more than 50 years, Times has been the leader in the development of new cable technologies to meet the demands of evolving RF and microwave applications. This technological, manufacturing and application leadership continues today. Since its inception, Times has been dedicated to the improvement of coaxial cable technology and the development of new and innovative cable products to address the increasingly rigorous demands placed on RF transmission products. The expertise that has provided cable solutions for the demanding requirements of airborne electronic warfare systems has led the way in the development of Ultra low loss coaxial cable for Amateur Radio and Broadband Wireless application as well coaxial cables for shipboard, airborne and ground based military systems. Times has been instrumental in the development of military specifications, including MIL-C-17 for coaxial cables. Unlike other manufacturers with limited product lines, the philosophy of Times Microwave Systems is to select or design the right product for each application. Since we have expertise in both cable and connector design and manufacturing, as well as in assembly of complete transmission lines, we can provide the best technical approach. Our range of manufacturing capabilities is unmatched, allowing us to consider the broadest range of products and choose the best one for the application. If one of our standard products is not the right choice for the application, we have the capability to design a custom product.

CN Tower

CN Tower
The idea of the CN Tower originated from the 1968 Canadian National Railway desire to build a large TV and radio communication platform to serve the Toronto area, as well as demonstrate the strength of Canadian industry and CN in particular. These plans evolved over the next few years, and the project became official in 1972. The tower would have been part of Metro Centre (see CityPlace), a large development south of Front Street on the Railway Lands, a large railway switching yard that was being made redundant by newer yards outside the city. Key project team members were NCK Engineering as structural engineer; John Andrews Architects; Webb, Zerafa, Menkes, Housden Architects; Foundation Building Construction; and Canron (Eastern Structural Division).
At the time, Toronto was a boom town, and the late 1960s and early 1970s had seen the construction of numerous large skyscrapers in the downtown core, most notably First Canadian Place. This made broadcasting into the downtown area very difficult due to reflections off the buildings. The only solution would be to raise the antennas above the buildings, demanding a tower over 300 metres (984 ft) tall. Additionally, at the time, most data communications took place over point-to-point microwave links, whose dish antenna covered the roofs of large buildings. As each new skyscraper was added to the downtown, former line-of-sight links were no longer possible. CN intended to rent "hub" space for microwave links, visible from almost any building in the Toronto area. The CN Tower can be seen from at least as far away as Kennedy Street in Aurora, Ontario, approximately 40 kilometres (25 mi) to the north, and from several points on the south shore of Lake Ontario, 48 kilometres (30 mi) to the south in New York state in the United States.
The original plan for the tower envisioned a tripod consisting of three independent cylindrical "pillars" linked at various heights by structural bridges. Had it been built, this design would have been considerably shorter, with the metal antenna located roughly where the concrete section between the main level and the Sky Pod lies today. As the design effort continued, it evolved into the current design with a single continuous hexagonal core to the Sky Pod, with three support legs blended into the hexagon below the main level, forming a large Y-shape structure at the ground level.
The idea for the main level in its current form evolved around this time, but the Sky Pod was not part of the plans until some time later. One engineer in particular felt that visitors would feel the higher observation deck would be worth paying extra for, and the costs in terms of construction were not prohibitive. It was also some time around this point that it was realized that the tower could become the world’s tallest structure, and plans were changed to incorporate subtle modifications throughout the structure to this end.
On June 26, 1986, the ten-year anniversary of the tower’s opening, high-rise firefighting and rescue advocate Dan Goodwin, in a sponsored publicity event, used his hands and feet to climb the outside of the tower, a feat he performed twice on the same day. Following both ascents, he used multiple rappels to descend to the ground.[7]

CONSTRUCTION

Construction on the CN Tower began on February 6, 1973 with massive excavations at the tower base for the foundation. By the time the foundation was complete, 56,000 t (61,729 ST; 55,116 LT) of dirt and shale were removed to a depth of 15 metres (49.2 ft) in the centre, and a base incorporating 7,000 cubic metres (9,156 cu yd) of concrete with 450 tonnes (496 ST; 443 LT) of rebar and 36 tonnes (40 ST; 35 LT) of steel cable had been built to a thickness of 6.7 metres (22.0 ft). This portion of the construction was fairly rapid, with only four months needed between the start and the foundation being ready for construction on top.
To build the main support pillar, a hydraulically-raised slipform was built at the base. This was a fairly impressive engineering feat on its own, consisting of a large metal platform that raised itself on jacks at about 6 metres (19.7 ft) per day as the concrete below set. Concrete was poured continuously by a team of 1,532 people until February 22, 1974, during which it had already become the tallest structure in Canada, surpassing the recently built Inco Superstack, which was built using similar methods. In total, the tower contains 40,500 cubic metres (52,972 cu yd) of concrete, all of which was mixed on-site in order to ensure batch consistency. Through the pour, the vertical accuracy of the tower was maintained by comparing the slip form’s location to massive plumb-bobs hanging from it, observed by small telescopes from the ground. Over the height of the tower, it varies from true vertical accuracy by only 29 millimetres (1.1 in).
In August 1974, construction of the main level commenced. Using 45 hydraulic jacks attached to cables strung fr

Andrew Antenna VHLP2-13-2WH

Andrew Antenna VHLP2-13-2WH
ValuLine® High Performance, Point-to-Point Microwave Antenna
Low profile, single-polarized, high performance parabolic shielded antenna
Andrew Solutions VHLP Series antennas are ideal for microwave applications demanding excellent pattern performance where space is at a premium and aesthetics are important
Andrew Solutions specially engineered family of ValuLine Antennas provides exceptional performance and value in a low-profile design. In addition, ValuLine Antennas are designed to easily integrate with radio outdoor units to create a highly reliable, cost-effective transmission solution.
Andrew Solutions designs and engineers a complete range of point-to-point microwave antennas that help operators to maximize bandwidth efficiency and increase system reliability while minimizing both capital and operational expenditures.

The intelligent design of VHLP antennas combines efficient beam-forming capabilities with high gain, all while minimizing frequency congestion. Equipped with a painted reflector, each antenna also features a high effeiciency feed system, a long life radome, and vertical pipe mount. All are engineered and tested to Andrew’s uncompromising standards.

Radiation Pattern Envelopes—For each antenna model, Andrew publishes a complete range of radiation pattern envelopes (RPEs). Each detailed pattern envelope provides an easy-to-read and informative description of how the antenna performs at various frequencies and along specific planes. Copies of the RPEs for each antenna are also on file at various regulatory offices around the world.
Ideal for high density areas where space is at a premium and aesthetics are important
Integrates easily with radio outdoor units
Single polarized operation
Low lifetime cost

andrew microwave antennas

andrew microwave antennas

20 ft CB or Ham Radio Antenna Cable - Andrew Commscope CNT-240 Coaxial Cable 6ft Ham or CB Radio Antenna Coax UHF VHF HF LMR240 Times Microwave Coaxial Cable Antenna RF Transmission Line PL-259 Connector LMR240
MADE IN THE USA – Andrew CNT braided cables are constructed from the highest quality copper, aluminum, and polyethylene materials for superb electrical and mechanical performance. Andrew CNT cable solutions satisfy any application, indoors or outdoors, with robust outer jackets that shield them from abrasion and environmental damage. CNT provides an ideal balance of performance, flexibility, and economy. The bottom line? Andrew CNT cables are built to perform. Designed to Flex – Braided cable technology has turned the corner with Andrew CNT cables and connectors being essential for any RF application that requires low signal loss. Our proven braiding technology helps ensure lower attenuation at every frequency. Even when flexed into the tightest bend radius for an extended time, Andrew CNT cable minimizes loss so you always get maximum performance. Andrew’s 70-year global legacy of supporting the telecommunications and wireless industries demonstrates our commitment and experience. We deliver an unparalleled breadth of solutions, including high quality antennas, feeder cable, accessories, and cable assemblies at competitive prices. Our unrivaled US Based manufacturing and distribution infrastructure enables us to swiftly deliver CNT solutions anywhere. Andrew CNT products are available factory direct and through our extensive distribution network, making it easy for you to get what you need,on your schedule. Andrew works closely with distribution partners to provide sales,technical, and product support, helping you stay one step ahead of your projects. Our dedication to customer service includes training classes and direct access to Andrew’s engineering expertise for answers to all of your technical questions.

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